The Flavor of Wisconsin for Kids

(2012)
The Flavor of Wisconsin For Kids

From brats on the grill and festival fare to fresh farm market fruits and veggies, food is an essential part of summer fun in Wisconsin.  Savor the flavors with this feast of fun facts, history and recipes by local food expert Allen and local history writer Malone.

Many of the recipes feature native fish and game, produce from farm fields, gardens and orchards, wild food from forests and waterways, as well as foods processed in the state.  Although written for kids,  most recipes are challenging enough for families to work together (with plenty of safety tips), or for grownups to enjoy cooking basics.  Each recipe is rated with a visual key with spoon-shaped icons, from easy (1 spoon) to challenging (3 spoons),  I tried the lumberjack-style “Cookee’s Biscuits,” (2 spoons) and the wild rice pudding with cherries (1 spoon).  Success!  One quibble: I was hoping for a cherry pie recipe to match the inviting cover art, but found none.

The recipes are mixed well with a huge helping of photographs, history and facts about farms and farm markets, community gardens, cheese making and other food industries, native culture and foods, origins of food traditions, popular attractions such as Old World Wisconsin, the history of food preservation, and more!  The many ethnic and cultural groups settling in the state over the years are represented well in the text and photos, and the recipes include a variety of traditional foods from German and Polish, to Hmong and Mexican.

Learn how cranberries got their name, and a fun way to test them for freshness!  Missed the state fair this year?  Make your own cream puffs!  What is schmorn?  Find out!

Whether you are inspired by the “Food” exhibit at the History Museum at the Castle, need an idea on what to fix with your goodies from the Downtown Appleton Farm Market, or want to find out more about the variety and bounty the state has to offer, the “Flavor” is worth a taste!

Recommended for ages 9 and up.

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