2nd grade

  1. Santa Claus and the Three Bears

    Santa Claus and the Three Bears

     In this clever, Christmassy take on a beloved fairytale, Papa, Mama and Baby are polar bears; when they are out walking, waiting for their Christmas pudding to cool, a certain special visitor comes to call, hungry and tired after finishing most of his holiday rounds.  Santa Claus thinks the pudding has been left for him, and thereby hangs the rest of the tale!  Santa, the bears, and their cozy house and surroundings are charmingly detailed in soft watercolors by mother-daughter duo Jane and Brooke Dyer.

     

  2. Me First

    Me First

     

    In this book, translated from the French, a duckling is determined to be first at everything in his day, from going outside, to fishing, to bathing, to lunch.  Until he hears humans at lunchtime discussing the lunchtime menu: duck.  He slinks away slyly, meowing all the way.  He has learned that being first is maybe not always the best option!  I love Di Giacomo's illustrations--bright and vibrant colors.  Highly recommended for preschool through grade 2.

  3. A Little Book of Sloth

    Meet the most adorable sloths in Costa Rica's Sloth Sanctuary!  The photographs are stunning and the humorously presented information about sloths will keep the reader’s attention.  Meet the cutest baby sloths and some of their older companions.  Learn about all their goofy personalities and silly antics.  Also learn how the sanctuary he

  4. Hoop Genius: How a Desperate Teacher and a Rowdy Gym Class Invented Basketball

    In 1891 a school teacher named James Naismith, desperate to manage a rowdy gym class in Springfield, Massachusetts, invented a new game he called "Basket Ball". It started with a list of rules scratched on paper, two old peach baskets and a soccer ball. The game was an instant sensation. The origin of the national sport of basketball is humorously written and illustrated in this picture book. Enjoy the original first draft of "Basket Ball" rules inside the cover. Author's notes add biographical details for the curious reader.

  5. Flying Solo

    Flying Solo

     

    Almost everyone has heard of Amelia Earhart, but Ruth Elder is a new name to many.  Ruth wanted to be the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean solo in 1927, just like Charles Lindbergh.  Unfortunately, after 36 hours in the air, Ruth had serious trouble with an oil line rupture and had to abandon her plane in the ocean.  Fortunately, there was a ship nearby to rescue her.  Ruth charmed her way into the public's eyes, and by 1929 forty women met to begin a cross country race. 

  6. Fortunately, the Milk

    Fortunately, the Milk

     

      Milk is good for me. I know this and I try to drink it once in awhile, but I can’t say that I really enjoy it.   The only time I find milk indispensable is when I am eating breakfast cereal. Once, being out of milk, I tried water. In case you were wondering, water is not a good substitute for milk on cereal.

  7. This is the Rope

    This is the Rope

     

    I learned from the author's note of this book that the time period between the early 1900s until the mid 1970s was considered "the Great Migration" where more than 6 million African Americans moved from the south to Northern cities such as New York City.  The book is dedicated to those who left the South to move to the North.

     

  8. Tito Puente, Mambo King /Tito Puente, Rey del Mambo

    Tito Puente, Mambo King /Tito Puente, Rey del Mambo

    This bilingual English/Spanish book celebrates the life of the great Latin Jazz musician Ernest “Tito” Puente (1923-2000).  Readers learn about Tito in different stages of his life: as a baby (in New York City of Puerto Rican parents), banging out rhythms on pots and pans; as a kid drumming and dancing his way to talent show success (but still finding time to play baseball with the neighborhood kids); as a young man in the Navy serving his country while developing his gift of playing and writing music; and as a professional musician who wins fame, fortune, love and admiration by using

  9. Tap the Magic Tree

    Tap the Magic Tree

     

    This interactive picture book is nothing but fun from beginning to end.

  10. Desmond and the Very Mean Word

    Desmond and the Very Mean Word

     

    According to the author's note at the back of the book, this story is inspired by something that actually happened to the author (Archbishop Tutu) as a child in South Africa. 

  11. Binky Takes Charge

    Binky Takes Charge

    Binky is no ordinary cat; unbeknownst to his owners, he is a certified space cat, and their home is a space station!  After several adventures featuring space travel (going outdoors), battles with aliens (bugs), a daring rescue of Binky’s beloved toy mouse, Ted, and a challenge from a superior officer (foster cat Gracie), Binky has been promoted to lieutenant by F.U.R.S.T.

  12. Alphasaurs and Other Prehistoric Types

    Book cover

    Hi, everyone! My name is Miss Kristi (a.k.a. the new Library Assistant in Children’s Services). With my reviews, you will find a lot of picture books, books about art, books to film and YA fiction. To get us started, I recently read Alphasaurs and Other Prehistoric Types by Sharon Werner and Sarah Forss. Awesome doesn’t even begin to describe this book!

  13. TJ Zaps the New Kid

    TJ Zaps the New Kid

     

    The new series TJ Trapper, Bully Zapper, by Lisa Mullarkey published by Magic Wagon is a nice addition to all of the anti-bullying material being published right now.  In TJ Zaps the New Kid, said new kid Livvy is a social bully, who says and does unkind things to her classmates.  When TJ tries to report Livvy's bullying to his teacher he is reprimanded for tattling, and TJ struggles to find another way to end Livvy's bullying. 

  14. Knit Your Bit

    Knit Your Bit

     

    "Knit Your Bit" was a slogan of the American Red Cross during World War I when the Red Cross decided there would not be enough warm clothes for the soldiers over the cold winter in Europe.  Men, women, and children began knitting for soldiers.  There really was a "knit-in" at Central Park in New York City on July 30, 1918, which is the setting for this fabulous historical fiction. 

  15. A Splash of Red

    A Splash of Red

     

    This outstanding non-fiction picture book for older readers tells the story of African American artist Horace Pippin.  A quote from the book: "Pictures just come to my mind...and I tell my heart to go ahead," is touching when you think of a child who did not have real art supplies of his own until he won a contest.  During World War I Horace was wounded in the right shoulder, and was unable to draw the way he had loved to so much. 

  16. Let's Sing a Lullaby With the Brave Cowboy

    Let's Sing a Lullaby With the Brave Cowboy

    I love Jan Thomas’ silly, charming books with her bold, colorful comic-style illustrations, from Rhyming Dust Bunnies to Is Everyone Ready for Fun?  Let’s Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy is her latest to date, and in my opinion, another hit. The cowboy of the title is actually not so brave; in his attempts to settle his cows down for the night, he interrupts his own lullaby with startled exclamations about what he imagines is lurking in the dark.  The cows calm and reassure him--until, that is,  something really IS in the shadows!

  17. Henry and the Cannons

    Henry and the Cannons

     

    In 1775, the British Army had settled in Boston, and General Washington had no way of getting them to leave.  Bookstore owner Henry Knox had the idea to retrieve 59 cannons from Fort Ticonderoga...in the middle of the winter.  This involved traveling over ice, snow, mountains, woods, lakes, and once in a while there was a road to follow.  After fifty days of traveling from Fort Ticonderoga, Henry arrived in Boston with all 59 cannons. 

  18. Around the Neighborhood:

    Around the Neighborhood:

     

    Around the Neighborhood: a Counting Lullaby is an adaptation of "Over in the Meadow", the classic folk song that was first written down in 1870.  A mother and her baby baby set off for a walk around the neighborhood, and see numerous animals that a child might normally see in their neighborhood, such as cats, crows, bees, or ladybugs.  The illustrations were produced digitally, and are easy to recognize, with bright colors galore.

  19. The Beetle Book

    The Beetle Book

      “Line up every kind of plant and animal on Earth…and one of every four will be a beetle.”  So begins the Beetle Book by Steve Jenkins, a treasure trove of fascinating facts about beetles the world over, including information about body structure, life cycles, communication, defenses, and other beetle behaviors.

  20. I Love Our Earth--Amo Nuestra Tierra

    I Love Our Earth--Amo Nuestra Tierra

     

    This bilingual poem by the late author of the famous Brown Bear, Brown Bear series, Bill Martin Jr. and Michael Sampson tells some of the very descriptive reasons our Earth is so beautiful.  Dan Lipow's photographs are lush and bright with color.  The children featured in the pictures are from multiple cultures, although the photos do not identify them.  This book was recently successfully shared in a Spanish/English bilingual storytime.  For all ages.

  21. Each Kindness

    Each Kindness

    Regretting a lost opportunity to offer friendship and kindness is the strong, thought-provoking message of Jacqueline Woodson’s Each Kindness, which won the 2013 Charlotte Zolotow Award.

  22. Stay

    Stay: The Story of Ten Dogs

    “Why do it?” I asked myself.  “Just months ago, you reviewed a book about a dog with a second chance at a happy life (Saving Audie by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent), so why do another so soon?”  “I can’t help it!” was my reply.  “I’ve fallen in love, and people in love can do foolish things.  So there!”

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