Fiction

  1. The Fenway Foul-Up

    The Fenway Foul-Up

    This series, Ballpark Mysteries, is for both baseball fans and mystery fans. In Fenway Foul-Up, a lucky bat is stolen, and Mike and Kate are on the case. Lots of baseball trivia for those who enjoy baseball. A second book in the series was released simultaneously.
    For students in 2nd to 4th grade.

  2. True (...sort of)

    Eleven year old Delly has an impulsive nature that constantly gets her in trouble for fighting, skipping class, hacking spitballs, and more.   The fact that she creates her own words like, “mysturiosity” and “bawlgrammit” is entertaining for the reader, but it also reflects a certain independent quality in Delly’s character.  Unfortunately for Delly, if she does one more thing wrong, she’s going to get sent off to a school for troubled kids.   To avoid more outbursts, Delly first tries counting in her head when she’s upset.  Then, her attention turns to a new
  3. The Birthday Ball

    The Birthday Ball

    This book by Newbery winning author Lois Lowry features Princess Patricia Priscilla, who will soon turn sixteen and choose a suitor to marry. The Princess is bored with her life and disguises herself as Pat, a poor peasant girl. Pat discovers a love for school and is disappointed that she will not be able to continue. This book is filled with alliteration, rhymes, and wordplay.

  4. Happy Birthday, Bad Kitty

    Happy Birthday, Bad Kitty

    This installment in the Bad Kitty series which began as a picture book series and then morphed into chapter books, is a look at Bad Kitty’s birthday party. We meet many different breeds of cats all coming to the party bearing gifts, none of which make Bad Kitty happy. Interspersed with scientific facts about cats, this heavily illustrated book is laugh out loud funny, and is recommended for 3rd grade and up.

  5. Ready for Kindergarten, Stinky Face?

    Ready for Kindergarten, Stinky Face?

    This beginning reader is a continuation of the Stinky Face picture book series. The main character, Stinky Face, asks “what if” questions to his mother about going to Kindergarten. The questions get sillier and sillier as the book progresses, including a question about a hungry armadillo and art class.

  6. The Talent Show

    The Talent Show

    Dan Gutman (author of "Babe and Me" and "Return of the Homework Machine") offers a humorous look at the lives of elementary age students in The Talent Show. After a tornado rips through the small town of Cape Bluff, Kansas, the residents need a way to raise money to rebuild their town and raise morale. The town decides to put on a talent show, with students from the elementary school providing the talent. Everyone wants to get in on the action, talent or no talent!

  7. Forge

    Forge is book two of an impressive trilogy about the African American experience during the American Revolutionary War.  While this is not a subject that is typically well developed in our history lessons, it is meticulously well researched by this author and impressively executed with unforgettable characters.  In book one,
  8. Ninth Ward

    Ninth Ward is a perfect choice for both avid readers and reluctant readers. Set in the ill-fated 9th Ward of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, this story develops unique and beautiful characters while invoking a regional history of belief in magic and mysticism. Nine year old Lanesha is about to have the fight of her life. Lanesha was born with the gift of “sight”, the ability to communicate with ghosts, but has trouble communicating with her mother, who died during child birth. Mama Ya Ya, the elderly woman who has raised Lanesha, has the ability to see into the future.

  9. The Day of the Pelican

    Eleven year old Meli Lleshi is living a happy life with her Muslim Albanian family in Kosovo in 1998 when her life is turned upside down by the Kosovo War between the Serbs and the Albanians.  The murder of fellow Albanians and the brief but terrifying disappearance of Meli's 13 year old brother, Mehmet, mark the beginning of this story.  On the run from ethnic cleansing, Meli's family will abandon their home and business on a journey to escape.  This journey will take them to the mountains, Uncle's farm, miles of traveling on foot while pushing Grandma in a wheelbarrow,

  10. Little Blog on the Prairie

    Thirteen year old Gen doesn't want to spend her entire summer vacation with her family at an 1890's styled frontier camp.  It's her mother's idea to commit the family to this experience in living history and the owners of this camp take their social experiment very seriously.  To preserve her sanity, Gen smuggles in a cell phone so that she can text her friends about every painful experience of forced frontier life, including the details of meeting Caleb, a very cute fellow camper, and Nora, the very jealous and bitter daughter of the camp owners.   Gen discovers that th

  11. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

    Minli lives with her mother and father, passing their days trying to eke out a living in rice fields on Fruitless Mountain.  At night, her father, a great storyteller, tells Minli adventures and magical folktales.  Mother, unhappy with the family's difficult life, does not approve of Father filling Minli's head with such nonsense.  After a chance encounter with a goldfish peddler, Minli decides to go on a quest to find The Old Man of the Moon to change their family fortune.  Along the way, Minli befriends a dragon, encounters a talking fish and learns about the "tangled

  12. The Magic Half

    The middle child between two sets of twins, Miri feels overlooked and out of place even in her own family. Not only that, but, unlike most of her friends, she still likes to play pretend games and still wants to believe that magic is real even though nothing magical has ever happened to her. Miri and family have just moved into an old house, and her small bedroom, with its worn and ugly wallpaper, seems strange to her. Sent to her bedroom after hitting her brother, Miri discovers a glasses lens taped to one of the walls.

  13. We Can't All Be Rattlesnakes

    We Can't All Be Rattlesnakes

    A story told from the animal's point of view, a female gopher snake is captured by a "filthy, fleshy human child" named Gunnar. The boy calls the snake "Crusher," and puts his new "pet" in a terrarium in his bedroom, next to cages occupied by wild animals that Gunnar has captured but since lost interest in. While looking for her chance to escape, Crusher observes Gunnar and his habits, his family, friends, and his love of video games.

  14. There Is No Dog

    There Is No Dog

    I liked Meg Rosoff's There is No Dog. It's a funny, somewhat scattered, odd little story that I wasn't expecting. I think when you read the blurb on a book that tells you God is a stereotypical teen boy, you get some expectations--like seeing a preview for a Will Farrel movie. I expected much more zaniness than this story brought, and I appreciate that the humor was more understated.

  15. A Simple Thing

    A Simple Thing

    Susannah Delaney‘s life is unraveling. Her son Quinn, a quiet, cerebral child is being severely bullied at school and her high-spirited, 14 year-old daughter Katie is spiraling out of control. Susannah makes the drastic decision to move her family thousands of miles away from home to an isolated island off the coast of Washington, where there is no electricity, only a one-room school and any resemblance of a store is an hour boat ride to the mainland. Life on the island is anything but easy and Susannah must also deal with Katie’s hostile attitude towards her.

  16. The Princess and the Packet of Frozen Peas

    The Princess and the Packet of Frozen Peas (2009)

    This fractured version of "The Princess and the Pea" stars Prince Henrik, who is ready to get married. He wants a girl who likes hockey and camping, plus has a nice smile. He asks his brother, Prince Hans, for advice, and observes his sister-in-law Princess Eva, a sensitive (read: whiny) princess. Henrik decides he wants the very opposite of Princess Eva, and performs the opposite of the typical princess test by putting a full bag of frozen peas under a thin mattress.

  17. Home in the Cave

    http://www.infosoup.org/record=b1881876~S77

    Baby Bat never wants to leave his cozy cave where thousands of little bats and their mothers sleep together like a huge furry coat and where Mother Bat provides warmth and milk. But Baby Bat grows bigger and must soon practice wing-flapping to learn to fly and hunt in the outside world. One night when he practices wing-flapping, he takes to the air, but falls down into the nest of Pluribus Packrat. P.

  18. Dead Reckoning

    Dead Reckoning

    Two strong young women are traveling through the dangerous Wild West of the late 1800s. Jett came from a wealthy New Orleans family, whose wealth and home were destroyed during the Civil War, so she hates Yankees.  She doesn’t believe her twin brother Philip is dead, and is traveling the West by horseback to find him.  In order to be safe she dresses like a male gunslinger, and earns her way by gambling, though she longs to return to her old life.

  19. Winter Garden

    Winter Garden

    I got hooked on Kristin Hannah years ago after reading Angel Falls and have been an avid fan of hers ever since. Her books tend to be warm, romantic reads and the plots usually have strong family ties. In 2010 she published the book, Winter Garden. I anticipated a nice, heart-warming story as always, but this book went far beyond her usual charm. The book chronicles the lives of sisters, Nina and Meredith. The story opens with Nina and Meredith as adult children of a warm-hearted father and a seemingly distant mother.

  20. Zombies vs. Unicorns

    Zombies vs. Unicorns

    The question on everyone's mind these days: Which is better, Zombies or Unicorns? This unique short story collection pits the walking dead against magic glitter in a grudge match unlike any other. Edited by Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier, this collection features some of the best teen authors writing today, including Libba Bray, Garth Nix, and Cassandra Clare.

  21. Assault With a Deadly Glue Gun

    Assault with a deadly glue gun
    The first title in a new series, this is a stitch from beginning to end! (Pun intended) The heroine, Anastasia Pollack, is the crafts editor at what she describes as a"medium classy" national women's magazine. She has just been informed her husband was not out of town at a work meeting, but gambling in Las Vegas, keeled over and died. Sounds funny so far, right? Suddenly she is a widow, with enormous debts, no assets, and a self-proclaimed communist mother in law (and devil-dog) permanently living with her. But the surprises just keep on coming!
  22. Best of Me

    The Best of Me

    Every single one of this author's books has made me cry! Sparks continues his normal style of getting to a place in your life where either you must make a big decision, or you have one forced upon you. The consequences are never quite what you expect. He makes you examine your choice, and makes you think about how your life, or someone else's, would be if circumstances were different. If only you didn't have to choose. If only you could go back and change a choice. If only you could have it both ways. This particular story brings Amanda and Dawson together after many years.

  23. Things We Didn't Say

    Things We Didn't Say

    I really liked this book!  The title is absolutely perfect, and says it all.  The characters and their interactions are very real; you are smack dab in the middle of this family’s life.  Mom and dad are divorced, the kids live with dad, and he is engaged to a woman they barely know, much less trust.  You feel their hopes, share their dreams and hurts with each disappointment.  The story is told through the voice of one character at a time; each character gets their turn to talk, but they talk only to you and not each other.  And that, dear reader, is the proble

  24. The True Story of Hansel and Gretel

    True Story of Hansel and Gretel

    Will we ever truly understand what it was like to be Jewish in World War II? Probably not, but this book adds another perspective. Just like in the fairy tale you remember, two children are abandoned in the woods and if you pay close attention there is even a trail of breadcrumbs. But it isn't because the stepmother doesn't like them. The family is running for their very lives. They must all lose their identities in order to survive. Even their names have to change. There is a cottage in the woods, a mysterious and frightening old woman, and a big oven.

  25. Before I go to sleep

    Before I go to sleep

    Our memories are what make us who we are. Imagine waking up in the morning and having absolutely no memory of your life. Now imagine doing that every day, for years. This is the situation for Christine, who has a rare form of amnesia. Each day is a blank slate. A first novel from British author S. J. Watson, I found this to be an exciting and haunting story. There are a few terms that give it a British flavor, but it could easily take place anywhere. The main character is someone you care about from page one, as she shares her life, one day at a time.

  26. Dorchester Terrace

    Dorchester Terrace

    As a reader with an avid interest in history, Anne Perry provides some of the most meticulously researched series I’ve ever read. Her two most famous (and intertwining) series are the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt and William Monk mysteries. They are set in Victorian England, and move from the world of the rich and famous to the hopeless poverty and dark underworld of Dickensian London. In the first book Thomas Pitt is a gamekeeper's son turned policeman, a relatively new profession.

  27. The Night Circus: a novel

    The Night Circus
    Le Cirque des Rêves arrives without fanfare and without invitation. Dozens of black-and-white striped tents cover a local field, but no one and nothing moves during the day. The circus is only open at night, when it becomes an extraordinary wonderland of tents, each providing a fantastic magical act, animal show or acrobats performing remarkable feats. There is no color at the circus—everything is black or white, even the flames of the bonfire. One day it will disappear as quietly as it came, only to reappear somewhere else around the globe.
  28. Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead

    Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead

    Claire DeWitt is not your average private investigator. She has a brilliant mind and great detective skills but Claire also uses dreams, drugs and Détection—a detective manual written by mysterious French detective Jacques Silette—to find answers in her investigations. She has returned to New Orleans—a thing she has avoided since the murder of her mentor--to investigate the disappearance of prosecuter Vic Willing, known for his skill in winning convictions for homicides.

  29. Map of True Places

    Map of True Places

    Brunonia Barry is back with an emotionally resonant novel of tragedy, secrets, identity and love.

  30. I am Half-sick of Shadows

    I am Half-sick of Shadows

    Flavia de Luce is eleven years old, one of three motherless sisters living in 1950s England. She takes an extreme interest in chemistry--especially poisons--and fortunately is in possession of her Uncle Tar's laboratory where she can make use of the information she discovers. In the first three books she deals with a corpse in the cucumber patch, cruel pranks by her older sisters, and gets involved in mysteries involving old murder investigations, puppet theaters, and gypsies.

  31. The Real Macaw

    The Real Macaw

    Meg Langslow is a blacksmith, an amateur detective, and now the mother of four-month-old twins. She hears a noise during a night feeding and goes downstairs to find their living room crammed with animals and birds which her doctor father, zoologist grandfather and CORSICANS (animal shelter volunteers) have rescued before they meet untimely ends, as the no-kill shelter has been forced to change its policy due to financial woes in the town.

  32. The Paris Wife

    The Paris Wife:  a Novel

    Hadley Richardson was a Midwestern spinster when she first met Ernest Hemingway, seven years her junior. She was naïve, having been an invalid during most of her childhood and tending her mother through her long final illness. Ernest swept her into the world of flappers, jazz and speakeasies.

    Soon they moved to Paris for the atmosphere, the jazz, the nightlife—and a place where Ernest could concentrate on his writing. There they became part of the “Lost Generation”—partying with famous artists and writers such as Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein and F. Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald.

  33. The Medusa Plot

    The Medusa Plot

    In Vesper's Rising, the last book in The 39 Clues series, reader's are introduced to another threat to the world and the Cahill family..the Vespers.  Authors Korman, Lerangis, Watson, & Riordon are back in a new series of  The 39 Clues called

  34. Good Graces

    Good Graces (2011)

    While technically this isn't a favorite read, I long had been looking forward to reading the sequel to the 2010 Fox Cities Reads book selectionWhistling in the Dark, by Lesley Kagen.

  35. The Language of Flowers

    The Language of Flowers (2011)

    Victoria is a young woman whose only way of connecting with others is through a language no one knows. When Victoria was 10, Elizabeth, one of her foster mothers, shared with her the near-forgotten language of flowers: honeysuckle for devotion, asters for patience, red roses for love… thistles for hate and distrust of human beings.

  36. Patrick F. McManus' outdoor humor

    Patrick F. McManus

    If you consider yourself an outdoorsperson or know someone who loves hunting, fishing, camping or outdoor gear, you will likely enjoy the humor of Patrick F. McManus. His life stories and musings are a mix of truth and exaggeration featuring many memorable characters, like mountain-man-old-timer Rancid Crabtree, and Crazy Eddie Muldoon: a great child-inventor who always had a new, 'good idea' of how to 'surprise' his parents. ("And guess what, Pat! You get to test the deep sea diving outfit! Don't that sound fun?!")

  37. The Stolen Child

    The Stolen Child (2006)

    Hobgoblins kidnap Henry Day when he is 7 years old, leaving an imposter in his place. Each Henry tries to adjust to his new life. Living in the forest with other stolen children who are also waiting to switch places, the 'real' Henry struggles to piece together fragmented memories of who he was. Meanwhile, the 'imposter' continually fears discovery and cannot forget that he is living a life that doesn’t belong to him; he eventually seeks out the truth of who he was before he too had been stolen and exiled to live in the forest as a hobgoblin (long before he stole Henry's life).

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