Non-Fiction

  1. Remarkable Trees of the World

    http://www.infosoup.org/search~S77?/Xremarkable+trees+of+the+world&searchscope=77&SORT=D/Xremarkable+trees+of+the+world&searchscope=77&SORT=D&Submit=Search&SUBKEY=remarkable+trees+of+the+world/1%2C4%2C4%2CB/frameset&FF=Xremarkable+trees+of+the+world&searchscope=77&SORT=D&1%2C1%2C
    http://www.infosoup.org/search~S77?/Xthe+life+and+love+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ/Xthe+life+and+love+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=the+life+and+love+of+trees/1%2C104%2C104%2CB/frameset&FF=Xthe+life+and+love+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&1%2C1%2C
    http://www.infosoup.org/search~S77?/Xmeaning+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ/Xmeaning+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=meaning+of+trees/1%2C17%2C17%2CB/frameset&FF=Xmeaning+of+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&1%2C1%2C
    http://www.infosoup.org/search~S77?/Xseeing+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ/Xseeing+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=seeing+trees/1%2C33%2C33%2CB/frameset&FF=Xseeing+trees&searchscope=77&SORT=DZ&1%2C1%2C

    Perhaps it is the time of year, but I love reading books about trees, especially books that include awesome pictures of trees. One of my favorites is Thomas Pakenham’s” Remarkable Trees of the World”.  His previous book, “Meetings With Remarkable Trees” concentrated on trees in Britain and Ireland, but this book takes him all around the world. Each featured tree is illuminated with a large picture and a page or so written about why it is included in the book. I am hard pressed to pick a favorite.

  2. Team of Rivals

    Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (2005)

    In 1860, Abraham Lincoln was a former one-term congressman and two-time failed senate candidate from Illinois. Despite this feeble resume, he managed to outmaneuver the top leaders of the Republican party—all far more experienced and better known than Lincoln—and win the nomination for president. Once elected, and as the southern states began pulling out of the Union, Lincoln selected these same political rivals as the members of his new cabinet.

  3. The Mind

    The Mind, edited by John Brockman

    The Mind is very similar in structure to one of my earlier staff picks: Future Science. Editor John Brockman presents contributions from some of the world’s leading scientists on the workings of the brain and aspects of human consciousness, development, memory, and learning.

     

  4. Aaron Rodgers

    Aaron Rodgers
    Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers Super Bowl XLV

    The state legislature has declared 12/12/12 “Aaron Rodgers Day” in Wisconsin, in honor of the Green Bay Packers star quarterback with the uniform number 12.  Young readers can celebrate the success of this remarkable athlete with two books added to the library’s collections this past year.

  5. A Peculiar Treasure

    A Peculiar Treasure (1939)

    From the 1920s to the 1960s, Edna Ferber was one of America’s most popular writers, turning out a string of best-selling novels, such as So Big (Pulitzer Prize winner), Show Boat, Come and Get It, and Giant, many of which became equally successful plays and films. Ferber herself also wrote successful plays (Stage Door, The Royal Family) with theatrical legend George S. Kauffmann, and was peripheral member of the famed Algonquin Round Table of notable wits.

  6. Redirect

    Redirect:  the surprising new science of psychological change (2011)

    This is definitely one of my favorites; it is not, however, a self-help book (if you peruse Amazon reviews, many readers’ expectations were defied and disappointed by that fact – most likely due to a misinterpretation of the sub-title). Rather, Redirect presents the practice of story-editing to effect successful interventions in personal and social issues.

  7. Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries

    The short version: This is an excellent collection of articles by the author of The Men Who Stare at Goats and The Psychopath Test that will satisfy fans of those books, as well as those who enjoy off-beat journalism and stories like those that air on This American Life. For more details, read on.

  8. Women from the Ankle Down

    Bergstein explains why women, in particular, absolutely love shoes. Even more than our clothing, shoes offers us a means to communicate who we are as individuals. But Bergstein goes beyond the stories of various cobblers who became famous for their footwear. She also describes the behind the scenes machinations that brought about the famous Ruby Slippers in The Wizard of Oz. They were actually silver in L. Frank Baum’s book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz but red would be more of a contrast against the yellow brick road filmed in Technicolor.

  9. Tiny Beautiful Things

    Wow. That's what I kept thinking as I read Cheryl Strayed's Tiny Beautiful Things.  Just wow.This is the kind of book that is about so much more than simple advice for an individual. As Sugar, Strayed takes her readers' questions and uses them to examine larger questions about love and life that are in many ways universal . She does so in a gut-wrenchingly truthful way. I will be honest, this book is not always a comfortable read. There are stories in it that are painful and horrific. Yet even in these stories there is beauty and hope.

  10. Saving Audie

    Saving Audie

    The cover photo of the chocolate brown pit bull puppy with soulful amber eyes drew me to this book.  Saving Audie is a straighforward but heartwarming true account of this dog, one of many rescued from almost certain death in an illegal dogfighting organization co-owned by NFL player Michael Vick.  Kept for many months in shelters as evidence against the wrongdoers, with only numbers instead of names, the dogs faced an uncertain future.  While many people thought the dogs were dangerous and damaged

  11. The Flavor Bible

    The Flavor Bible

    One night I was preparing dinner from a recipe and, tasting it, realized it needed something. I added an ingredient to a small portion of it – an ingredient I didn’t particularly like – and found it was the perfect flavor foil. This was a particularly favorable feat because I did not even consult my copy of The Flavor Bible but, instead, mentally retrieved its explanation of balancing flavors and considered how I could emphasize or ‘push’ the existing taste to a brighter level.

  12. How To Sharpen Pencils

    How to Sharpen Pencils

    In this book, or rather manual, Mr. Rees adds to the current artisanal fad by presenting (in great detail) the craft of manually sharpening a pencil. He covers ten different types of pencil sharpeners, complete with pictures, sketches and clip art to illuminate the written word.

  13. Between Gears

    Between Gears book cover

    Review in brief: A comic book enthusiast and artist documents her senior year in college a page a day. Strongest recommendation to students interested in becoming artists themselves, but recommended generally to those between the ages of 14 and 35. The full review starts now.

    I don't think there's any way for me to describe Natalie Nourigat's Between Gears in a way that conveys how much I enjoyed it.

  14. Untied

    Meredith Baxter was no stranger to show business. Her mother, Whitney Blake, was an American television/film actress who appeared in Hazel, Perry Mason, and multiple westerns over the years. Meredith’s Pasadena, California family life was highly dysfunctional. Her mother was distant and often was secluded behind a closed bedroom door which Meredith was forbidden to enter. After divorcing Meredith’s father, Blake married Jack, a militaristic man who meted out severe punishment to Meredith and her older two brothers. He also made unwelcome sexual advances toward Meredith.

  15. George Gershwin

    George Gershwin: An Intimate Biography (2009)

    When informed that George Gershwin had died, the novelist John O’Hara wrote, “I don’t have to believe it if I don’t want to.” Gershwin was only 38 at the time of his death, and had been widely seen as the future of American music.

  16. Balloons Over Broadway

    Balloons Over Broadway

    Tony Sarg (1880 – 1942) was the master puppeteer who invented the first huge animal puppets that floated in the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. This is the story of a creative little boy who wondered at how things moved and worked, and who grew up to become the puppeteer of Macy’s parade.

  17. The House Baba Built

    The House Baba Built

    Illustrator Ed Young, winner of the Caldecott Medal for his book Lon Po Po, tells the unique story of his childhood in wartime China through award-winning author Libby Koponen. Young’s father, Baba, an engineer, devises a way of protecting his wife and five children and numerous other relatives and friends by constructing a bomb-proof house that becomes a playground for the children complete with a swimming pool.

  18. Avi

    Avi

    An inspirational and engaging biography of award-winning author, Avi.  The story of how he became fondly known as only “Avi”, which is not his real name, is revealed. It describes his poor childhood in New York during the war years and how he learned to survive. He fights a lifelong battle with dysgraphia. (“Dysgraphic people have trouble writing. They mix up or invert letters and misspell words.” p.

  19. French Books

    French on the Move for Kids

    Are you looking for games to play and music to listen to while on a car trip this summer?  Or perhaps you want a new project while waiting for school to start again?  OR are you a “Fancy Nancy” fan who longs to add some new words to your vocabulaire extraordinaire  Français?  Try these audiobooks, available on the Wisconsin Public Library Co

  20. Life as a Viking: an Interactive History Adventure

    Life as a Viking: an Interactive History Adventure

    This interactive history adventure is part of Capstone Press’ You Choose series.  You the readers choose whether to experience a Viking raid, serve in a Viking army, or fight the last battles of the Vikings, with 24 possible endings.  This book is packed with adventure and the unknown.  Check out other You Choose books such as Life as a Knight,

  21. The Frog Scientist

    This award winning non-fiction book is part of the Scientists in the Field series.  It's full of amazing photographs of a variety of mostly cute frogs.  There are a few exceptions.  One is a photo of the Sororan Desert Toad held by Dr. Tyrone Hayes who says, "He looks like a cow turd."   The Frog Scientist follows Dr.

  22. The Lonely Existence of Asteroids and Comets

    It’s a big universe out there, and information about it can be overwhelming.

  23. Listening Is an Act of Love

    If you listen to NPR on Friday mornings, you may be familiar with the interviews from David Isay’s StoryCorps Project.  Shortly after 9/11, David Isay decided he wanted to record an oral history of America.  Not just any history, mind you, he set out to capture the lives of everyday Americans --- your average John & Jane Doe, not the elite upper-crust celebrities that traditionally dominate the media.  He set up a recording booth in Grand Central Station in New York City where family members and friends can record interviews with each other.  It became so popular tha

  24. The Wrecking Crew

    The Wrecking Crew

    You might ask…what is Rock and Roll’s Best-Kept Secret? Read this book and find out! Here’s a clue…most of the finished product from studio recordings was performed by behind the scenes session musicians. Some of those musicians ultimately became famous in their own right. Think Glen Campbell, Leon Russell, and Neil Diamond, to name a few. Hartman leads us through the stories behind Phil Spector’s wall of sound, and Sonny and Cher’s rise to fame with their signature song, I Got You, Babe.

  25. 4 books: Restrictive Eating & Women's Self-Denial

    Unbearable Lightness, by Portia de Rossi
    Going Hungry: writers on desire, self-denial, and overcoming anorexia
    Gaining: the truth about life after eating disorders
    Appetites: why women want

    I frequently read in subject ‘clumps.’ Upon reading an interesting fact or blurb, I typically search for more books and articles in that area until my interest has run its course. In this case, what sparked my inquiry into restrictive eating disorders was, for me, a very unusual source.

  26. The Devil in the White City

    The Devil in the White City

    Author Erik Larson details the events surrounding the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, focusing on the stories of two men: Daniel H. Burnham, the architect responsible for the fair's construction, and H.H. Holmes, a serial killer masquerading as a charming doctor. I have read a lot of reviews where people had a strong preference for one story or the other, but found both equally intriguing.

  27. The Bolter

    The Bolter
    In the Edwardian age women were beginning to break down stereotypes. Suffragettes, women workers, and bolters—women who fled from their families to get freedom—were in the spotlight.
     
  28. Mornings with Barney

    Mornings with Barney

    I know, I know, we all cried when we read or saw Marley and Me. Do you really want to read another book about a man and his dog? I say yes, you do -- this one is different. By now you have figured out that I am a sucker for any animal story.

  29. Destiny of the Republic

    Destiny of the Republic

    The author was inspired to write this book when she was reading a biography of Alexander Graham Bell. This famous inventor, courted by people from around the world due to his invention of the telephone five years before, set aside all his other projects to try to create an instrument that would help heal President Garfield by locating the assassin’s bullet. Her research led her to discover the character of this “minor” President, shot four months into his tenure.

  30. The Poisoner's Handbook

    Untraceable poisons were easy to get, Tammany Hall controlled the coroner’s office while corrupt cops and politicians ruled Jazz Age New York—it had never been easier to get away with murder. This is how Pulitzer-prize winning author Deborah Blum’s fascinating story about the beginning of forensic and chemical detective work begins.

  31. To Timbuktu

    Casey, daughter of children’s book author/illustrator Jon Scieszka, and Steven met while studying abroad in Morocco during their junior year of college. They fell in love, and after their return to the US started a long-distance relationship. After graduation they decided to pursue their joint goals for nearly two years: 1) living abroad, 2) pursuing their creative interests, and 3) being together. The first six months were spent teaching English to children in Beijing. From China they toured south-east Asia including Thailand, Laos and Vietnam.
  32. Let's Pretend This Never Happened

    Let's Pretend This Never Happened: (A Mostly True Memoir)

    They say you can't judge a book by it's cover, but I'd say sometimes they are wrong. If, for example, the cover is graced by a taxidermied mouse in full Shakespearean garb (right down to the tiny skull of Yorick), a mouse who happens to have the elegant name of "Hamlet von Schnitzel," then as far as I'm concerned you have a pretty good idea about what kind of book it's going to be. And that is a bizarre, funny, ridiculous, funny, over-the-top, funny memoir by Jenny Lawson, better known to her fans as The Bloggess.

  33. American Pie

    American Pie: My Search for the Perfect Pizza (2003)

    Peter Reinhart is a major American authority and writer on bread baking. I came across American Pie several years ago while searching the Library catalog for anything else by Reinhart. Since I regularly made homemade pizza, it immediately appealed to me. A week later I purchased my own copy.

  34. Future Science

    Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge (2011)

    Future Science is the first installment in what editor Max Brockman hopes will be an annual collection; it consists of essays by young scientists who, for the first time, are presenting to a general reading audience the scientific hypotheses they are pursuing in their scholarly research. Nearly every essay is accessible (I skipped 2 of the 18 due to lack of interest).

  35. Quiet

    Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    Introverts are often indirectly told that their very way of being is a ‘condition’ or a ‘shell’ out of which they need to emerge. Susan Cain explores the fallacy of this and other beliefs about the introverted temperament in her fascinating book Quiet: The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking. Introversion is a preference for environments that are not overstimulating; many introverts are even quite sensitive to sights, sounds, smells, pain, and coffee. Extroverts recharge their batteries by socializing, while introverts recharge by being alone.

  36. The Psychopath Test

    The Psychopath Test : A Journey Through the Madness Industry (2011)

    In The Psychopath Test, journalist and filmmaker Jon Ronson delves into the definition of insanity, eventually coming to question the methods that are currently utilized for diagnosing psychopaths –- methods which, in many cases, require nothing more than a score of 30 or more on a 20-point checklist of characteristics common to psychopaths: things like glib and superficial charm, grandiosity, manipulative behavior, and lack of remorse.

  37. Patrick F. McManus' outdoor humor

    Patrick F. McManus

    If you consider yourself an outdoorsperson or know someone who loves hunting, fishing, camping or outdoor gear, you will likely enjoy the humor of Patrick F. McManus. His life stories and musings are a mix of truth and exaggeration featuring many memorable characters, like mountain-man-old-timer Rancid Crabtree, and Crazy Eddie Muldoon: a great child-inventor who always had a new, 'good idea' of how to 'surprise' his parents. ("And guess what, Pat! You get to test the deep sea diving outfit! Don't that sound fun?!")

  38. The Myth of Sanity

    The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness (2002)

    Explores the prevalence of Dissociative Identity Disorder, popularly known in its most extreme form as multiple personality disorder. Dr. Stout, a psychological trauma specialist, conveys how small things we interpret as distraction, spacing out, or situational fatigue are physiologically and behaviorally not different from an abused individual’s experience of dissociation or hypnotic trance.

  39. The Heart and the Fist

    The Heart and the Fist: The Education of a Humanitarian, the Making of a Navy SE

    Greitens, a Rhodes Scholar and humanitarian whose work took him to Rwanda, Albania, Mexico, India, Croatia, Bolivia, and Cambodia, recounts his unexpected decision to join the Navy SEALS. “We can certainly donate money and clothing, and we can volunteer in the refugee camps. But in the end these acts of kindness are done after the fact. They are done after people have been killed, their homes burned, their lives destroyed. Yes, the clothing, the bread, the school; they are all good and they are all much appreciated.

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