Science

  1. What If?

    What If? by Randall Munroe

    Randall Munroe earned a degree in physics at Christopher Newport University (VA) and went on to work on robots at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia before quitting to become a cartoonist  (xkcd.com: “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language”).  He employs humorous stick figure sketches to help provide scientific answers to absurd hypotheticals submitted to him through his website.

  2. A Little Book of Sloth

    Meet the most adorable sloths in Costa Rica's Sloth Sanctuary!  The photographs are stunning and the humorously presented information about sloths will keep the reader’s attention.  Meet the cutest baby sloths and some of their older companions.  Learn about all their goofy personalities and silly antics.  Also learn how the sanctuary he

  3. Outliers

    Outliers: The Story of Success

    Malcolm Gladwell has made a career of looking at things we thought we knew from a different perspective, as he did in his previous best-sellers Blink and The Tipping Point.  In Outliers, he examines success.  What makes someone successful?  Sure it’s hard work—did you know that it takes 10,000 hours of dedicated work to master just about any field?—but it’s also opportunity.  And culture.  And pure accident.  Using examples from the famous and the unknown, along with the most recent scientific studies, Gladwell presents a surprising c

  4. Zombie Makers

    Zombie Makers

    If you believe that zombies are only in scary stories or movies…think again.  If you are grossed out at the thought of creatures that take over the bodies and brains of other creatures, this review--let alone this book--is not for you.  Just walk away.

  5. Gulp

    Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, by Mary Roach

    I had long heard of Mary Roach's titles but never tried one. Gulp fell into my lap when a coworker heard about it and placed it on hold for me, figuring I would like it. I can see why Mary Roach's writing is so popular: she mixes great, science-y information with a fantastic sense of humor that is typically presented in tongue-in-cheek or dry asides as well as side-splitting footnotes.

  6. The Mind

    The Mind, edited by John Brockman

    The Mind is very similar in structure to one of my earlier staff picks: Future Science. Editor John Brockman presents contributions from some of the world’s leading scientists on the workings of the brain and aspects of human consciousness, development, memory, and learning.

     

  7. Redirect

    Redirect:  the surprising new science of psychological change (2011)

    This is definitely one of my favorites; it is not, however, a self-help book (if you peruse Amazon reviews, many readers’ expectations were defied and disappointed by that fact – most likely due to a misinterpretation of the sub-title). Rather, Redirect presents the practice of story-editing to effect successful interventions in personal and social issues.

  8. The Poisoner's Handbook

    Untraceable poisons were easy to get, Tammany Hall controlled the coroner’s office while corrupt cops and politicians ruled Jazz Age New York—it had never been easier to get away with murder. This is how Pulitzer-prize winning author Deborah Blum’s fascinating story about the beginning of forensic and chemical detective work begins.

  9. Future Science

    Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge (2011)

    Future Science is the first installment in what editor Max Brockman hopes will be an annual collection; it consists of essays by young scientists who, for the first time, are presenting to a general reading audience the scientific hypotheses they are pursuing in their scholarly research. Nearly every essay is accessible (I skipped 2 of the 18 due to lack of interest).

  10. Quiet

    Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    Introverts are often indirectly told that their very way of being is a ‘condition’ or a ‘shell’ out of which they need to emerge. Susan Cain explores the fallacy of this and other beliefs about the introverted temperament in her fascinating book Quiet: The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking. Introversion is a preference for environments that are not overstimulating; many introverts are even quite sensitive to sights, sounds, smells, pain, and coffee. Extroverts recharge their batteries by socializing, while introverts recharge by being alone.

AddThis
Subscribe to Science